Grandview Gates, Railings & More...

For about 35 years, I have been cutting, heating, bending, shaping and welding metals together to make various different projects. My father helped me strike my first welding arc when I was just eight years old! As time went by, I honed my skills in the welding and fabrication world. Learning new tricks and techniques that allowed me to construct many different projects.  Many of these years were spent within the ironworker trade. There I learned the art of ironworking, which touched base on, and included,  many aspects of millwrighting, ornamental and structural steel work.

As time went by, the entrepreneur in me was anxious to venture into new territory. Grandview gates was then conceived. Being able to work, weld and construct using raw steel and ornamental wrought iron became very appealing to me, so here we are.  In closing, don't be fooled by what our name implies. We are certainly more, than just gates!

 Grandview gates is.....

 

  • Committed to service, reliable, prompt, answer your calls, informing you of project status.
  • CWB Canadian Welding Bureau certified 
  • Fully insured, protection for us, and for you!
  • Member of Ontario’s One Call (Ground location service)
  • Quality, a high level of excellence, including design, build durability and installation practices.
  • Commitment to you, to build your new product to meet or exceed all industry standards of quality, design, function and durability.

Wrought Iron History

Wrought Iron History

Wrought iron is an iron alloy with a very low carbon (less than 0.08%) content in contrast to cast iron (2.1% to 4%), and has fibrous inclusions known as slag of up to 2% by weight. Before the development of effective methods of steelmaking and the availability of large quantities of steel, wrought iron was the most common form of malleable iron.


Many items...

Many items...

before they came to be made of mild steel, were produced from wrought iron, including rivets, nails, wire, chains, rails, railway couplings, water and steam pipes, nuts, bolts, horseshoes, handrails, straps for timber roof trusses, and ornamental ironwork. Due to the ability to produce vast amounts of steel into an array of shapes and sizes. Wrought iron is no longer produced on a commercial scale.


Many products...

Many products...

today described as wrought iron, such as fences, garden furniture and gates. Are actually made from mild steel and some are made from cast iron. They retain that description "wrought iron" because in the past they were wrought (worked) by hand.

Michael     *     905-868-2488        This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.